El Paso Telescope Cafe, in conjunction with El Paso Public Libraries, presents Night Sky Tours for El Paso families to enjoy this summer for free.

El Paso Telescope Cafe

Discover the night sky! Moon enthusiasts are invited to learn about lunar science and participate in a celestial observation of outer space.

Have you ever wondered what the moon looks like up close, or have you ever really seen Saturn's rings? You can witness this and much more during the upcoming Night Sky Tours set to start tomorrow, June 15, at the Dorris Van Doren Public Library in West El Paso.

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Experience celestial bodies through ultra-high-definition telescopes bringing outer space to life. See the impressive wide rings of the planet Saturn, the deep surface and craters of the Moon, and even colorful blue, gold, and orange double stars in crystal clear definition. And if you're lucky, you might just get to witness a shooting star or two.

El Paso Telescope Cafe

Join local astronomer Chris Grohusko of El Paso Telescope Cafe as he guides attendees through an up-close viewing of the moon, planets, and star systems beginning tomorrow for a free special after-hours Night Sky Tour that will surely delight kids and adults alike.

Dorris Van Doren Library

  • Thursday - July 15, 2021
  • 8 p.m. to 10 p.m.
  • Viewing of Waxing Crescent Moon
  • Free

Chamizal Community Library

  • Wednesday – July 21, 2021
  • 8 p.m. to 10 p.m.
  • Viewing of Waxing Gibbous Moon
  • Free

Irving Schwartz Library

  • Friday – July 23, 2021
  • 8 p.m. to 10 p.m.
  • Viewing of Waxing Gibbous Moon
  • Free

For more information, visit elpasolibrary.org or follow El Paso Telescope Cafe on Instagram.

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