There is nothing more fun than scrolling through social media and checking out all the cool stuff like old songs, people dancing to old songs, and getting up to speed on the latest trends that the kids are making go viral. If we didn't have social media who would have thought to try and swallow an entire spoonful cinnamon? Or find out what tasty candy is in the swirl of a Tide Pod? Or whether or not they could walk up and down a stack of precariously balanced milk crates? All those things are dumb enough, but the latest TikTok trend is even dumber because it happens in the one place you are supposed to go to get smart - school.

The challenge is the 'Devious Lick' challenge and it is all about either stealing or destroying school property. By the way, the kids say 'lick' when they mean steal. At first, the challenge seemed to center on stealing things like soap dispensers out of the school restrooms, but it has escalated into outright theft with teachers reporting that their purses are being stolen out of their desks, and vandalism as you can see in this Instagram post by Richardson Middle School.

If I were a parent and my kid got caught doing this, we would be gathering up their electronics, their bikes, and whatever else I could sell so they could pay for the damage they caused. Parents pay the property taxes that schools rely on to keep their doors open and I would make sure those brats would know that they are paying my tax dollars back as they watched me sell their stuff.

Kids can get prosecuted for this kind of vandalism. If they are caught and disciplinary action is taken by the school it could also be a part of their permanent school record. If they put this kind of stupidity on social media, chances are a college or university could see it and it could affect their ability to get accepted to a university or college. And it's just damned wrong. There should be consequences for actions like the ones at Richardson. Enough is enough.

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