A co-parenting situation involving McDonald's and baby mama drama that had the internet up in arms this past week may have been fabricated all along.

But does it even matter if the whole thing was fake?

Unless you've been under a digital rock, a video involving a single mother of four kids sparked debate when she chastised her son's father for bringing him McDonald's for lunch while bringing nothing for her other three kids. The man pushed back on her efforts to "expose" him by saying that he shouldn't be responsible for the other three kids due to the fact that the mother of his child had those children by other men.

You can actually jump into that story by following any of the links that take you to the original story as well as the follow-up from the alleged baby mama, who responded to the backlash by adding more details to the story that ultimately painted her to be the villain according to the majority of the collective internet.

After millions of views, and just as much debate over every possible angle of this situation, it became apparent that the video's creators may have been taking people for a ride all along.

Once the little boy's mother was identified as Eliz McGlaston (according to her social media pages) it was realized that she was a video creator and self-described "Toxic Baby Mama Over 160k on TikTok Youtuber, Content creator, actress, Influencer" according to her Instagram account.

Instagram, @eliz_mcglaston
Instagram, @eliz_mcglaston
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McGlaston also included an email address for business inquiries as well as a link to her official YouTube page where more "toxic baby mama" content could be found.

As a matter of fact, her most recent video on Instagram was posted less than a day ago and it seems like she has moved on to another skit involving a toxic woman/baby mama situation.

In the wake of these discoveries, bloggers, YouTubers, and other influencers have pointed out how the viral McDonald's baby daddy skit was fake.

But one thing that I noticed was also something that every one of these video creators brought up in their videos exposing the situation as fake or fraudulent.

The fact that the video was fake doesn't even matter at this point, because the debate at the center of the viral clip is very real and definitely triggered emotions for a lot of people who watched it.

Even after the woman followed up the clip with her explanation, people were still leaving comments on who is right and who is wrong in the specific situation at the center of her original video.

Instagram
Instagram
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Many pointed out that "skit or not," these situations are more common than we think and are "just sad." Another commenter pointed out that whether or not they are real, the skits are "definitely conversation pieces."

Others were dismissive, criticizing the creator for "dragging" out the situation in "another skit."

Instagram
Instagram
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Has this been a double-edged sword for McGlaston? On one hand, she was at the center of one of the largest conversations on social media last week, but on the other hand, it doesn't seem like she necessarily benefitted from the situation beyond views and followers.

But was the backlash worth it? Are producers in her inbox with acting gig offers? All those questions can only be answered by McGlaston, but she can definitely hang her hat on the fact that she sparked one of the biggest debates that I've seen online in quite some time.

Also, I'm sure McDonald's saw a few extra sales, too.

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