There is nothing I am more afraid of than heights. I hate driving over the Spaghetti Bowl in Central El Paso and if you're behind me you should probably get ready to crawl over that crazy thing at 5 miles per hour because I'm not going any faster than that. Don't even get me started on the new Spaghetti Bowl on the far east side of town. If I ever had to drive over that I would just stop at the top and start crying from fear.

Given what a chicken I am about heights, I can't imagine what I would have done if I had the same experience as a group of kids who got stuck at the top of a ride at Western Playland this past weekend. Saturday night, a group of about 8 teenagers were on the iconic El Bandido when it stopped at the top of the ride. The kids were safe in their carts but they were 60 feet in the air on a ride that malfunctioned. I don't even want to think about how terrified I would have been. Well, let's be real, I wouldn't have gotten on the thing anyway. Check out the video that the teens filmed while they were waiting to be rescued.

Because they are teenagers none of them looked like they were freaking out but the view down over the edge of the tracks made my head swim. And what is up with the hype guy who kept saying "yeahhhhuh"? I think I would have smacked him upside the head for making things worse.

Western Playland says they are going to be inspecting the ride on Monday to find out what went wrong.

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