Here’s a list of the most common poisonous snakes in El Paso.

Of course, we have snakes in El Paso - it is a desert after all, but I guess I never really thought about it until I made a stop at the McDonald’s by Vinton, NM. It was late in the evening as I went through the drive-through for a drink when I heard a commotion.  Through my rearview mirror, I spotted a worker from McDonald’s and another employee wrangling a snake. At first, I wasn’t sure what was happening but soon realized what was going down and desperately wanted to flee the scene sans drink in hand. I didn’t actually drive-off and instead painstakingly watched as they removed the reptile from the drive-through as if it was a common daily task.

Here’s the thing, I’m terrified of snakes and I often think about those gnarly videos online of snakes popping up from toilets, car vents, shoes, or whatever may have you and it terrifies me to think that snakes are slithering around our deserts in El Paso.

According to HolyFamilyPetCare.com, the most common venomous snakes found in the El Paso area are:

Western Diamondback Rattlesnake

Texas Parks & Wildlife Department

Rock Rattlesnake

Texas Parks & Wildlife Department

Mohave Rattlesnake

Texas Parks & Wildlife Department

Black-Tailed Rattlesnake

Texas Parks & Wildlife Department

Prairie Rattlesnake

Texas Parks & Wildlife Department

Massasauga

Texas Parks & Wildlife Department

Since snakes are coldblooded they do tend to avoid hot temperatures and therefore prefer to roam at night, late evenings or during early mornings. So please take extra caution when you go hiking or take walks close to our deserts or mountainous areas especially if you have pets or children accompanying you. Check out the Texas Wildlife Parks Department for more details about these slithering snakes.

Snakes might be cool and all but honestly if I ever found one in my home or vehicle I’d never go back inside either one of them, ever!