Almost eight years ago a century old iconic landmark on El Paso's westside was brought down as part of what was known as Demolition Weekend. The twin stacks of ASARCO were part of a two day extravaganza of clearing away the old to make way for the new. The ASARCO stacks came down after years of debate about what to do with them. ASARCO had been closed for years and some people wanted to keep them and turn the area into a river walk or an amusement park, and people who wanted the stacks to come down.

When it was ultimately decided that the stacks would come down, it was decided to bring them down on the same weekend that the old City Hall would be demolished to make room for the downtown ballpark. I got up super early that morning to take this video and I can still remember the concussion of the explosives that brought down the stacks.

When it was happening I don't remember saying oh my God so many times but listening to it now makes me lol. I think I kept saying that because those stacks had been a part of my life, my parent's lives, and my grandparent's lives. I had mixed feelings about them coming down because they were so iconic, but I know that getting rid of them and their toxicity was for the best.

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And if you think that I was the only one who couldn't stop saying oh my God over and over as they watched the stacks fall, you should watch this video. The guy who filmed it kept saying it too so I don't feel too goofy about it.

LOOK: Stunning vintage photos capture the beauty of America's national parks

Today these parks are located throughout the country in 25 states and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The land encompassing them was either purchased or donated, though much of it had been inhabited by native people for thousands of years before the founding of the United States. These areas are protected and revered as educational resources about the natural world, and as spaces for exploration.

Keep scrolling for 50 vintage photos that show the beauty of America's national parks.