El Paso Public Health officials announced another confirmed case of measles. Another boy toddler has tested positive, the fourth case of the virus in El Paso in less than two weeks. These four cases are the first in the city in 25 years.

City officials say the community needs to "focus on making sure that they are up-to-date with their measles or MMR vaccine. When we vaccinate ourselves and our children we are not only protecting ourselves and our family, but also reducing the chances of the disease spreading to others in our community."

Whether you are for or against vaccinations, you need to know that this particular virus is very contagious. The CDC says that 90-percent of people who are not vaccinated and who are exposed to the virus will become infected. You need to speak to your pediatrician about measles and MMR vaccination to keep your child safe.

The next question is, should you, as an adult, get a booster shot? Is it safe? According to the CDC:

1. If you were born before 1957, you are considered protected from the measles.

2. If you were born after 1957, you need at least one dose of measles vaccine or it is confirmed that you had past measles infection or are immune to measles. Certain adults may need 2 doses. You can click here to find out if you need those doses.

3. If you got the killed measles vaccine in the 1960s, you should talk to your doctor about getting revaccinated with the current, live measles-mumps-rubella (MMR) vaccine. Click here to find out if you need to do that.

These answers might scare you, but you can either go to the CDC website by clicking here, or you can always go to your doctor and discuss whether you need to get a booster.